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    In this issue: Small Town Makes a Big Commitment to its Future, Clean Water for All, New Real Estate for an Osprey Pair ...and more! Read Online Now »

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Welcome to Delaware’s Inland Bays





The Rehoboth, Indian River, and Little Assawoman Bays lie just behind a narrow spit of land in sight of the Atlantic Ocean. Our mission is to preserve, protect and restore Delaware’s Inland Bays and their watershed.

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DE Center for the Inland Bays
DE Center for the Inland Bays
Spooky season is in full swing! Can anyone guess what local species these chompers belong to?

Check back tomorrow morning for the answer!
DE Center for the Inland Bays
DE Center for the Inland Bays
Living along the coast comes with risks this time of year, as many will remember from Hurricane Sandy's impact eight years ago. While Delaware was spared a direct hit, this massive fall storm killed more than 150 people and left behind $72 billion in damages across multiple states. Local impacts are shown in this image of flooded homes in Fenwick Island.

But Hurricane Sandy wasn't the first and won't be the last natural disaster to threaten our livelihoods. This year, the Atlantic Basin has seen so many named storms that the NOAA NWS National Hurricane Center had to turn to the Greek alphabet for only the second time in its history, according to the Washington Post. Scientists expect climate change impacts like increasingly warm sea surface temperatures are likely to continue that trend.

We hope that you have considered storm preparedness on top of all the other challenges we must face in this modern world. If you haven't, preparede.org has a lot of helpful resources to get you started.
DE Center for the Inland Bays
DE Center for the Inland Bays
Are you interested in learning more about living shorelines and how they can work in more urban areas, as well? Tomorrow, three experts will discuss one of the East Coast's most innovative and comprehensive stormwater retrofit projects, which includes a living shoreline, during an online webinar. For more information or to register, click the link below:
DE Center for the Inland Bays
DE Center for the Inland Bays
Happy Watershed Wednesday!

Most people are familiar with the popular blue crabs that can be found in our Bays, but we think slow-moving spider crabs like the one we spotted hanging out on our pilot oyster reef this week deserve some love and appreciation, too!

These interesting crustaceans come with tan-colored, spiked shells and are a type of "decorator crab" because they use their spikes and materials like algae, debris and even small invertebrates to camouflage themselves. To learn more about this group of crabs, check out this article from the University of Delaware: https://www.udel.edu/udaily/2017/december/crabs-decorating-behavior-predator.
DE Center for the Inland Bays
DE Center for the Inland Bays
DE Center for the Inland Bays
Thank you Senator Tom Carper, Speaker of the House Rep. Pete Schwartzkopf, Dewey Beach Mayor Dale Cooke and everyone else who joined us this morning in Dewey Beach to learn more about our living shoreline work!

"All over the East Coast, all of our towns, we're all experiencing the same thing. We're all trying to solve the same problems," said our Executive Director, Chris Bason. "And this is the future of solving the problems along the coast: living shorelines."

Today we visited our living shoreline project at Read Avenue, where, before we completed our project, flood waters from storms and high tides frequently washed out the road. We also stopped by Sunset Park, where we are planning another living shoreline project to restore habitat and reduce flooding issues. Thank you to the town officials, state agencies, partners, and contractors who make projects like these possible!

Learn more about living shorelines and our work by visiting us online at inlandbays.org.
DE Center for the Inland Bays
DE Center for the Inland Bays
Reducing pollution, preparing for climate change, and restoring habitat are all critical to the health of the Inland Bays in the coming decades. As we plan how we will tackle these challenges over the next 10 years, we want to make sure that residents and visitors are sharing their thoughts on these shared goals by commenting on our revised Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP).

The draft CCMP, developed over several years, is open to public comment through Nov. 15. To learn more and participate, visit us online at inlandbays.org.

 

Explore the Inland Bays!


 

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